Topic : TKIs

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Exploring new ideas for treatment – Part 3

In the first 2 parts, we looked at how novel therapies may interfere with biological pathways in the body that promote CML. In part 3, we’ll explore the connections between CML, asthma and fish oils.
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Exploring new ideas for treatment – Part 2

In Part 1, we looked at signalling pathways and how treatments that target these disease mechanisms may lead to better outcomes for people with CML. Now let’s turn our attention to red wine.
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Exploring new ideas for treatment – Part 1

The development of TKIs a decade ago revolutionized the treatment of CML. These medications (Gleevec, Sprycel, Tasigna, Bosulif and Iclusig) all work to inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. In some people, the disease may be so well suppressed that it amounts to a cure...
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10 questions to ask your doctor

When you first learn that you have CML, the news is often such a shock that you can’t even begin to think about the questions you need to ask. The internet can be an essential resource...
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Survival and CML: what the TKI revolution has meant

Life with chronic myelogenous leukemia changed a decade ago with what has been called the TKI revolution. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) medications changed not only how CML is treated, but people’s expectations of what can be achieved.
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Deep molecular response: beyond MMR

While these standards were being developed, new laboratory techniques were enabling even more sensitive PCR testing for BCR-ABL transcripts. This opened up a new world beyond MMR – to a 4-log reduction, a 4.5-log reduction, and even a 5-log reduction.
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Deep molecular response: what does it mean?

Perhaps the hottest concept in CML research today is that of the “deep molecular response”. So it’s worthwhile to examine how this idea emerged and what it means to people living with CML.
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EHA 2014: Stop trials and newer treatments

The advent of more potent TKIs, such as Sprycel and Tasigna, and the use of these agents earlier on has enabled many people to achieve a faster and deeper molecular response.
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EHA 2014: Getting the most from treatment

TKIs are used in CML to suppress the abnormal signalling that promotes uncontrolled proliferation of white blood cells. How effective a given medication is can be determined with a blood test that determines the amount of signalling molecules (called BCR-ABL transcripts).
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EHA 2014: Long-term survival with CML

Report on EHA 2014 – Part 1: There are several large databases worldwide that track people with CML. One of the larger ones is maintained by EUTOS (European Treatment and Outcome Study), which collects information from 27 countries.
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